Alphacrucis College Ltd: charity review

This is review in the series ‘Members of Missions Interlink’, Missions Interlink being ‘the Australian network for global mission[1].

Alphacrucis College Ltd’ is one such Member, and an organisation that allows donations online.

Both Members and Associates have to accept a set of standards, the introduction to which includes this statement:

http://tedsherwood.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/word-image-20.png

This Member did not respond to a draft of this review.

The charities’ regulator, the ACNC, in their article, Donating to Legitimate Charities, gives “some things to consider to help you make sure your donation is going where it is intended”:

  1. Check the charity’s name.
  2. Ask for identification from anyone seeking a donation.
  3. Be careful of online requests for donations.
  4. No tax deduction doesn’t mean the charity is not a legitimate one.
  5. Find out more about how the charity says it uses donations.

Here’s the results for ‘Alphacrucis College Limited’[2], with #5 supplemented by the essentials of the ACNC’s What should I consider when deciding which charity to support?[3].

1. A search on the ACNC Register of charities gives a charity in that name (Alphacrucis).

2. NA

3. The “web address begins with ‘https’ and there is a closed padlock symbol next to the web address in the address bar”, so the website is secure [the ACNC article above].

There is no mention on the first page of the giving process of the security of your information.

4. The Australian Business Register (linked from Alphacrucis’ ACNC Register record), says that the charity is entitled to receive tax deductible gifts. Likewise, for its fund, ‘Southern Cross College Building Fund’.

5. This is Alphacrucis’ mission: ‘Equipping Christian leaders to change the world.’

This is how they do it.

This is how that translates into giving options:

The audited account of how the donations are used is the Financial Report 2017 on the ACNC Register. Within that there are two statements that give information on how the donations were used. But you should first turn to the Notes to the accounts (Notes to the Financial Statements in this case) to check out the ‘Basis of preparation’.

Do you provide or give things to, receive things from, or have oversight of, or review, of Alphacrucis[4][vii]? Quite apart from perhaps being one the charity’s many students ($12.75 million ‘Gross student fees’, Financial Report 2017), perhaps you intend to donate or are one of the donors who gave $464K last year [Financial Report 2017]? Or you are one of the 167 employees (AIS 2017)? If so, can you ring Alphacrucis’ office and request that they prepare financial statements that answer the question or questions you have about the charity? I doubt it. You are therefore ‘potentially interested in the information provided in general purpose reports[5].

You are therefore in the wrong place – I only have access to the published accounts of Alphacrucis, and the directors[6][ix], with the agreement of the auditor[7], have declared that you don’t exist:

The directors don’t say for whom they have prepared the statements, saying only that ‘These special purpose financial statements have been prepared to meet the reporting requirements of the Act.’ (But if they should be preparing general purpose financial statements, then those requirements have not been met.)

Last year, they made the same decision (but didn’t say why). The previous year, however, they said that you did exist, which led to the decision to produce general purpose financial statements:

It is difficult to see the directors could make such a different decision for what is essentially the same organisation this year.

Their policy on including organisations they control (consolidation) is also confusing: in 2015 they said they didn’t consolidate but gave no reason; in 2016 they said that they had not consolidated, said that this was a contravention of the Accounting Standards, but again gave no reason; and this year they ignore the question of consolidation completely.

If Alphacrucis is still in the running for your donation (or business), here’s what they said about how your donations were used:

  1. Cash: Payments to suppliers and employees $13,249,756
    1. This is 97% of the cash outflows for operating activities.
  2. Accrual (expenses), the four largest:

‘Employee benefits and contractor expenses’ $8.56 million (62% of expenses)

‘Property expense’ $1.03 million (7% of expenses).

‘Other expenses’ $778K (1%)

‘Travel and entertainment expense’ $751K (1%)

There is no further information on the major expense.

There is no information on the relationship between the expenses and the four giving options (above).

There is no information on the impact of the charity’s activities – the change created in the people they help.

 

Please contact me if you need a more in-depth review.

 

 

  1. https://missionsinterlink.org.au/about/http://tedsherwood.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/word-image-21.png
  2. See here for my last review.
  3. Focus on the nature of the charity’s work, its beneficiaries and the impact the charity is having in the community.Is it clear what the charity is trying to achieve and how its activities work towards its objectives?

    Would you like to spend your money, or time if volunteering, to support these objectives?

    Is the charity being transparent about its activities? [A section in the article, Donating and Volunteering].

  4.  From Objective of General Purpose Financial Reporting (SAC2), www.aasb.gov.au: http://tedsherwood.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/word-image-15.png  
  5. From Objective of General Purpose Financial Reporting (SAC2), www.aasb.gov.au
  6. The people shown under ‘People’ here.
  7. Jeffrey Tulk, Partner, Saward Dawson.

 

Transform4Life: charity review

This is review in the series ‘Members of Missions Interlink’, Missions Interlink being ‘the Australian network for global mission[1].

Transform4Life’ is one such Member[2], and an organisation that allows donations online.

Both Members and Associates have to accept a set of standards, the introduction to which includes this statement:

http://tedsherwood.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/word-image-20.png

‘Transform4Life’ chose not to respond to a draft of this review.

’The charities’ regulator, the ACNC, in their article, Donating to Legitimate Charities, gives “some things to consider to help you make sure your donation is going where it is intended”:

  1. Check the charity’s name.
  2. Ask for identification from anyone seeking a donation.
  3. Be careful of online requests for donations.
  4. No tax deduction doesn’t mean the charity is not a legitimate one.
  5. Find out more about how the charity says it uses donations.

Here’s the results for ‘Transform4Life’[3], with #5 supplemented by the essentials of the ACNC’s What should I consider when deciding which charity to support?[4].

1.  A search on the ACNC Register of charities reveals a charity in that name – almost. ‘Almost’ because there is ‘Inc’ at the end of the name (meaning that ‘Transform4Life’ is an incorporated association, not an unincorporated one as is implied by the name on the website). For Transform4Life Inc to use the name this way, they should have it registered, and they (still) don’t. (Nor do they have ‘T4L’ registered. And wouldn’t be able to register it as it is held by another entity.)

2. NA

3. The website is not secure.

4. The Australian Business Register (linked from Transform4Life Inc’s ACNC Register record), says that the charity is entitled to receive tax deductible gifts.

5. This is Transform4Life’s mission:

Your giving is not able to be directed to one or other of these areas.

2018

Transform4Life Inc provide no information on their 2018 activities and outcomes.

The audited account of how the donations are used is the Financial Report 2018 on the ACNC Register. Within that there are two statements that give information on how the donations were used. But you should first turn to the Notes to the accounts (Notes to the Financial Statements in this case) to check out the ‘Basis of preparation’ (or similar).

For Transform4Life Inc, this tells us that they think that they are not a reporting entity. Whether or not this reasonable, the conclusion they draw from this isn’t. They say that it means that they don’t have to ‘apply accounting concepts or standards in the preparation and presentation of these statements’. Even though this is accepted by the auditor, Brian Bay, it is not true.

However, because Transform4Life Inc use cash accounting, there should be little effect on their calculation of where the donations went:

There is no further information on the major items here, including any assurance that the money sent overseas (one or more of five countries) was used for the purpose for which it was given.

No information is given on the impact of the charity’s activities.

 

Please contact me if you need a more in-depth review.

 

 

  1. https://missionsinterlink.org.au/about/
  2. http://tedsherwood.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/word-image-21.png
  3. See here for last year’s review.
  4. Focus on the nature of the charity’s work, its beneficiaries and the impact the charity is having in the community.Is it clear what the charity is trying to achieve and how its activities work towards its objectives?Would you like to spend your money, or time if volunteering, to support these objectives?Is the charity being transparent about its activities? [A section in the article, Donating and Volunteering].

 

Mukti Australia: charity review

This is review in the series ‘Members of Missions Interlink’, Missions Interlink being ‘the Australian network for global mission[1].

Mukti Australia’ is one such Member, and an organisation that allows donations online.

Both Members and Associates have to accept a set of standards, the introduction to which includes this statement:

http://tedsherwood.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/word-image-20.png

Mukti Australia chose not to respond to a draft of this review.

The charities’ regulator, the ACNC, in their article, Donating to Legitimate Charities, gives “some things to consider to help you make sure your donation is going where it is intended”:

  1. Check the charity’s name.
  2. Ask for identification from anyone seeking a donation.
  3. Be careful of online requests for donations.
  4. No tax deduction doesn’t mean the charity is not a legitimate one.
  5. Find out more about how the charity says it uses donations.

Here’s the results for ‘Mukti Australia’[2], with #5 supplemented by the essentials of the ACNC’s What should I consider when deciding which charity to support?[3].

1.  A search on the ACNC Register of charities gives three results:

If we go by the website that is linked from the Missions Interlink membership, it is the first one, Mukti Australia Inc. (Mukti).

Mukti is a member of an ACNC Reporting Group. This is the second entry above. There is one other member, The Trustee For Mukti Australia Overseas Aid Fund (the Fund) (the third one above).

2. NA

3. The “web address begins with ‘https’ and there is a closed padlock symbol next to the web address in the address bar”, so the website is secure [the ACNC article above].

A note at the beginning of the giving page says that ‘All payments are processed securely through our PCI-DSS-compliant international payment gateway provider’, but there is no link to allow verification of this.

4. The Australian Business Register (linked from Mukti’s ACNC Register record), says that the charity is entitled to receive tax deductible gifts. Likewise, for the Fund.

5. This is Mukti’s mission:

This is how they do it.

You can’t give to these directly; rather, you give to the work in one or other of India, Sri Lanka, or Australia (administration).

The audited account of how the donations are used is the Financial Report 2017 on the ACNC Register. Within that there are two statements that give information on how the donations were used. But you should first turn to the Notes to the accounts (Notes to the Financial Statements in this case) to check out the ‘Basis of preparation’.

Do you provide or give things to, receive things from, or have oversight of, or review, of the Mukti[4]? Perhaps you intend to donate or are one of the donors who gave $883K last year [Financial Report 2017]? Or you are one of the 108 staff (AIS 2017)? If so, can you ring Mukti’s office and request that they prepare financial statements that answer the question or questions you have about the charity? I doubt it. You are therefore ‘potentially interested in the information provided in general purpose reports[5]’.

You are therefore in the wrong place – I only have access to the published accounts of Mukti, and the directors[6], with the agreement of the auditor[7], have declared that you don’t exist:

The directors don’t say for whom they have prepared the statements, saying only that ‘These special purpose financial statements have been prepared to meet the reporting requirements of the Act.’ (But if they should be preparing general purpose financial statements, then those requirements have not been met.)

If Mukti is still in the running for your donation (or business), here’s what they said about how your donations were used:

  1. Cash: Payments to suppliers and employees $1.025,516
    1. This is 100% of the cash outflows for operating activities, and, for Mukti this year, almost 100% of all cash outflows.
  2. Accrual (expenses):

‘Employee benefits expense’ $277K (27% of expenses)

‘Overseas project distributions’ $554K (54% of expenses).

There is no information on the destination of these distributions. Nor on the relationship between them and (a) the three countries in which Mukti works, (b) the four areas in which it works, and (c) the four giving options.

There is no information on how Mukti (a) ensures that the money gets to the overseas organisation it is meant to, and (b) that it is spent on the program or programs for which it was sent.

There is no information on the impact of the charity’s activities.

 

Please contact me if you need a more in-depth review.

 

 

  1. https://missionsinterlink.org.au/about/ 
  2. See here for my last review.
  3. Focus on the nature of the charity’s work, its beneficiaries and the impact the charity is having in the community.Is it clear what the charity is trying to achieve and how its activities work towards its objectives?Would you like to spend your money, or time if volunteering, to support these objectives?Is the charity being transparent about its activities? [A section in the article, Donating and Volunteering].
  4. From Objective of General Purpose Financial Reporting (SAC2), www.aasb.gov.au:http://tedsherwood.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/word-image-15.png
  5. From Objective of General Purpose Financial Reporting (SAC2), www.aasb.gov.au
  6. The people shown under ‘People’ here.
  7. Geoffrey B Johnson, Chartered Accountant, Rucker DWC Pty Ltd.

 

YWAM Byron Bay: charity review

This is review in the series ‘Members of Missions Interlink’, Missions Interlink being ‘the Australian network for global mission[1] (and a means for a Member to get income tax exemption when it might not otherwise be available[2], with a consequent accountability regime).

YWAM Byron Bay’ is one such Member, and an organisation that invites donations in the ‘Pay’ menu.

Both Members and Associates have to accept a set of standards, the introduction to which includes this statement:

http://tedsherwood.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/word-image-20.png

‘YWAM Byron Bay’ chose not to respond to a draft of this review.

The charities’ regulator, the ACNC, in their article, Donating to Legitimate Charities, gives “some things to consider to help you make sure your donation is going where it is intended”:

  1. Check the charity’s name
  2. Ask for identification from anyone seeking a donation.
  3. Be careful of online requests for donations.
  4. No tax deduction doesn’t mean the charity is not a legitimate one.
  5. Find out more about how the charity says it uses donations.

Here’s the results for ‘YWAM Byron Bay’[3], with #5 supplemented by the essentials of the ACNC’s What should I consider when deciding which charity to support?[4].

1.   A search on the ACNC Register of charities gives no results. The website linked from Missions Interlink is also in the name ‘YWAM Byron Bay’. The ‘Contact Us’ page has the details of another organisation:

There is no explanation for this switch.

But it does give the clue that perhaps the charity is in the name ‘Youth With A Mission Byron Bay’. It is (hereafter YWAMBB).

One shouldn’t have to go through these hoops to check on an organisation that’s seeking your money.

YWAMBB has not registered ‘YWAM Byron Bay’.

2. NA

3. The “web address begins with ‘https’ and there is a closed padlock symbol next to the web address in the address bar”, so the website is secure [the ACNC article above].

It is not until the third page of the giving process that you are told that PayPal is used. There’s a link there to an explanation of PayPal’s security.

4. The Australian Business Register (linked from YWAMBB’s ACNC Register record), says that YWAMBB is entitled to receive tax deductible gifts, but only for a fund that it operates, ‘Youth With A Mission Byron Bay Building and Maintenance Fund’.

There is no mention of this fund on the website.

5. The mission is not described on the website. Via the main menu you can see what YWAMBB do: a thing called DTS, things for ‘Secondary Schools’, and, under ‘About’, various other activities they call ‘Ministries’.

No report of 2017 activities and outcomes is available because the AIS 2017 has still not been lodged, eight months after their year-end (it is two months overdue).

No Financial Report for 2017 is available because it is also overdue.

There is no information on outcomes, results or impact on the website.

 

 

 

  1. https://missionsinterlink.org.au/about/ 
  2. http://tedsherwood.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/word-image-21.png
  3. See here for last year’s review.
  4. Focus on the nature of the charity’s work, its beneficiaries and the impact the charity is having in the community.Is it clear what the charity is trying to achieve and how its activities work towards its objectives?Would you like to spend your money, or time if volunteering, to support these objectives?Is the charity being transparent about its activities? [A section in the article, Donating and Volunteering].

 

World Hope International Ltd: charity review

This is review in the series ‘Members of Missions Interlink’, Missions Interlink being ‘the Australian network for global mission[1].

World Hope International Ltd’ is one such member, an Associate, and an organisation that invites donations in the ‘Pay’ menu.

Both Members and Associates have to accept a set of standards, the introduction to which includes this statement:

http://tedsherwood.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/word-image-20.png

World Hope International Ltd chose not to respond to a draft of this review.

The charities’ regulator, the ACNC, in their article, Donating to Legitimate Charities, gives “some things to consider to help you make sure your donation is going where it is intended”:

  1. Check the charity’s name.
  2. Ask for identification from anyone seeking a donation.
  3. Be careful of online requests for donations.
  4. No tax deduction doesn’t mean the charity is not a legitimate one.
  5. Find out more about how the charity says it uses donations.

Here’s the results for World Hope International Ltd’, with #5 supplemented by the essentials of the ACNC’s What should I consider when deciding which charity to support?[2].

1.  A search on the ACNC Register of charities reveals a charity with that name (World Hope hereafter).

The website drops the ‘Ltd’ though. World Hope is allowed to do this because it has the necessary provisions in its constitution.

2.  NA

3. The “web address begins with ‘https’ and there is a closed padlock symbol next to the web address in the address bar”, so the website is secure [the ACNC article above].

There is mention of security on the giving page.

4. The Australian Business Register (linked from World Hope’s ACNC Register record), says that World Hope is entitled to receive tax deductible gifts.

5. There is no mission given on the website. Nor in the Annual Report.

This is how they describe what they do:

World Hope International is a Christian relief and development organisation working with vulnerable and exploited communities to alleviate poverty, suffering, and injustice.

Which translates into this list on the website:

  • Anti-Trafficking & Gender-Based Violence
  • Clean Water & Sanitation
  • Education
  • Emergency Response
  • Health & Nutrition
  • Social Ventures

No activities for 2018 are reported in the AIS 2018, but there is report on the second to fifth of these, plus ‘Rural Development’ and ‘Agriculture’, in the Annual Report (on the ACNC Register).

The audited account of how the donations are used is the Financial Report 2018 on the ACNC Register. Within that there are two statements that give information on how the donations were used. Most donors think in terms of cash, so if that’s you, you might turn first to the Statement of Cash Flows. What you might now know though, is that you first should turn to the Notes to the accounts (Notes to the Financial Statements in this case) to check out the ‘Basis of preparation’.

Do you provide or give things to, receive things from, or have oversight of, or review, of the World Hope[3][vii]? Perhaps you intend to donate or are one of the donors who gave $119K last year [Financial Report 2018]? If so, can you ring World Hope’s office and request that they prepare financial statements that answer the question or questions you have about the charity? Doubtful. You are therefore ‘potentially interested in the information provided in general purpose reports[4]’.

You are therefore in the wrong place – I only have access to the published accounts of World Hope, and the directors[5][ix], with the approval of the auditor[6], have again declared that you don’t exist:

Instead, the directors chose accounting policies ‘appropriate to meet the needs of the members of the Company’.

If World Hope is still in the running for your business, here’s what they told the members about how your donations were used:

  1. Cash: Payments to suppliers $219,909.84
    1. This is 100% of the cash outflows for operating activities, and, for World Hope this year, 100% of all cash outflows.
  2. Accrual (expenses): Project Payments:

This listing does not match the six types of activities given on the website (see above).

There is no information given – anywhere – on what steps, if any, are taken to ensure that these monies get to their intended destination and are then used for their intended purpose.

This is the only comment on the impact of the activities:

 

 

Please contact me if you need a more in-depth review.

 

 

  1. https://missionsinterlink.org.au/about/ 
  2. Focus on the nature of the charity’s work, its beneficiaries and the impact the charity is having in the community.Is it clear what the charity is trying to achieve and how its activities work towards its objectives?Would you like to spend your money, or time if volunteering, to support these objectives?Is the charity being transparent about its activities? [A section in the article, Donating and Volunteering].
  3. [vii] From Objective of General Purpose Financial Reporting (SAC2), www.aasb.gov.au: http://tedsherwood.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/word-image-15.png  
  4. From Objective of General Purpose Financial Reporting (SAC2), www.aasb.gov.au
  5. [ix] The people shown under ‘People’ here.
  6. Jason O’Connor CA, Registered Company Auditor.

 

Hope From Above: charity review

This is review in the series ‘Members of Missions Interlink’, Missions Interlink being ‘the Australian network for global mission[1].

Hope from Above’ is one such member, an Associate, and an organisation that allows donations online.

Both Members and Associates have to accept a set of standards, the introduction to which includes this statement:

http://tedsherwood.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/word-image-20.png

The charities’ regulator, the ACNC, in their article, Donating to Legitimate Charities, gives “some things to consider to help you make sure your donation is going where it is intended”:

  1. Check the charity’s name.
  2. Ask for identification from anyone seeking a donation.
  3. Be careful of online requests for donations.
  4. No tax deduction doesn’t mean the charity is not a legitimate one.
  5. Find out more about how the charity says it uses donations.

Here’s the results for ‘Hope From Above’[2], with #5 supplemented by the essentials of the ACNC’s What should I consider when deciding which charity to support?[3].

1.    A search on the ACNC Register of charities reveals a charity in that name – almost. ‘Almost’ because there is ‘Inc’ at the end of the name (meaning that Hope From Above’ is an incorporated association, not an unincorporated one as is implied by the name on the website). For Hope From Above to use the name this way, they should have it registered, and they (still) don’t.

Ministry comment: “As for using the “Inc.” after the organisations name, I think to remember that in logo’s and advertising texts the “Inc” is not required for not-for-profit organisations like ours. We have started an enquiry with the ACNC to clarify on this matter and they estimate a reply within 7 days.”

2. NA

3. The “web address begins with ‘https’ and there is a closed padlock symbol next to the web address in the address bar”, so the website is secure [the ACNC article above].

There is information on the secure service used for processing credit card donations, Stripe.

4. The Australian Business Register (linked from Hope From Above’s ACNC Register record), says that the charity is not entitled to receive tax deductible gifts. However, it is a ‘legitimate’ charity.

5. This is Hope From Above’s purpose (‘mission’):

More specifically, they work in three areas:

For more detail, see here.

Your giving is not able to be directed to one or other of these areas.

2018

For the information about 2018’s activities and outcomes that should be in the AIS, see the Annual Report on the Register.

The audited account of how the donations are used is the Financial Report 2018 on the ACNC Register. Within that there are two statements that give information on how the donations were used. But you should first turn to the Notes to the accounts (Notes to the Financial Statements in this case) to check out the ‘Basis of preparation’.

Do you provide or give things to, receive things from, or have oversight of, or review, of the Hope From Above[4][vii]? Perhaps you intend to donate or are one of the donors who gave $301K last year [Financial Report 2018]? Or you are one of the 25 staff (AIS 2018)? If so, can you ring Hope From Above’s office and request that they prepare financial statements that answer the question or questions you have about the charity? Doubtful. You are therefore ‘potentially interested in the information provided in general purpose reports[5]’.

You are therefore in the wrong place – I only have access to the published accounts of Hope From Above, and the directors[6], with the approval of the auditor[7], have declared that you don’t exist:

Instead, the directors chose to follow only those accounting policies required by the ACNC for special purpose financial statements plus the accounting policies ‘appropriate to meet the needs of the members’.

If Hope From Above is still in the running for your business, here’s what they told the members about how your donations were used:

  1. Cash: Payments to suppliers and employees $270,882
    1. This is 100% of the cash outflows for operating activities, and, for Hope From Above this year, 99% of all cash outflows.
  2. Accrual (expenses):

There is no comment on the relationship between the work they do and the fact that the majority of the expenses are for employing people.

There is no information offered on the $65K ‘Project Expense’.

Hope From Above works in six overseas countries. There is no information on the relationship between these countries and the three ‘areas’ in which they work (see above).

There is no information on the impact of the charity’s activities.

Ministry comment: “May I respectfully point out that our reporting meets the applicable requirements and has been approved by the membership.”

 

 

Please contact me if you need a more in-depth review.

 

 

 

  1. https://missionsinterlink.org.au/about/ 
  2. See here for last year’s review.
  3. Focus on the nature of the charity’s work, its beneficiaries and the impact the charity is having in the community.Is it clear what the charity is trying to achieve and how its activities work towards its objectives?Would you like to spend your money, or time if volunteering, to support these objectives?Is the charity being transparent about its activities? [A section in the article, Donating and Volunteering].
  4. [vii] From Objective of General Purpose Financial Reporting (SAC2), www.aasb.gov.au: http://tedsherwood.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/word-image-15.png  
  5. From Objective of General Purpose Financial Reporting (SAC2), www.aasb.gov.au
  6. The people shown under ‘People’ here.
  7. Jeffrey Tulk, Partner, Saward Dawson. [Opinion: I can’t see how it’s is right for the auditor’s logo to be on the cover of a charity’s Financial Report (or any page(s) other than the audit report). (Especially if more prominent than the name of the charity, the owner of the report.) The charity should have more pride in something that belongs to it, and both parties should want to avoid any impression that the Report belongs to any organisation other than the charity.]

 

Africa Inland Mission Ltd: charity review

This is review in the series ‘Members of Missions Interlink’, Missions Interlink being ‘the Australian network for global mission[1]’ (and a means for a Member to get income tax exemption when it might not otherwise be available[2], with a consequent accountability regime).

Africa Inland Mission International (Australia) Inc’ is one such Member, and an organisation that seeks donations from the public.

Both Members and Associates have to accept a set of standards, the introduction to which includes this statement:

http://tedsherwood.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/word-image-20.png

This particular charity did respond to a draft of this review, saying ‘Thanks for your updated review. We are considering your comments and will address any required changes in the new year.’

The charities’ regulator, the ACNC, in their article, Donating to Legitimate Charities, gives “some things to consider to help you make sure your donation is going where it is intended”:

  1. Check the charity’s name.
  2. Ask for identification from anyone seeking a donation.
  3. Be careful of online requests for donations.
  4. No tax deduction doesn’t mean the charity is not a legitimate one.
  5. Find out more about how the charity says it uses donations.

Here’s the results for ‘Africa Inland Mission International (Australia) Inc’[3] (AIM), with #5 supplemented by the essentials of the ACNC’s What should I consider when deciding which charity to support?[4].

1.   A search on the name on the ACNC Register of charities leads to a charity with the name Africa Inland Mission Ltd.  Presumably this is because this charity has the Missions Interlink name as one the four names under ‘Also known by’.

One, ‘AIM International’ is a trading name, but AIM holds no business names. As it does not have provisions in its constitution[5] that would allow it to drop the ‘Ltd/Limited’ from its name, it is therefore not entitled to trade under the name it uses, ‘Africa Inland Mission’.

2.   NA

3.   The “web address begins with ‘https’” and there is a “closed padlock symbol next to the web address in the address bar”, so the website is secure [the first ACNC article above].  The first giving page says ‘Secure donations by PayPal, but there is no link to a description of this security.

4.   The Australian Business Register (linked from AIM’s ACNC Register record), says that the charity is not entitled to receive tax deductible gifts.  AIM is, however, a ‘legitimate’ charity.

5.    Objectives

The ‘Mission’ on the website is for the worldwide collection of organisations, but there’s this description about Australia in the Annual Report 2018 [on the ACNC Register]:

Africa Inland Mission (AIM) in Australia partners in the role of empowering the world-wide Christian church in its responsibility to teach and make disciples of Christ according to the Great Commission of Jesus Christ in Matthew 28:19-20.

Activities (from the AIS 2018):

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The Annual Report 2018 shows that all these figures (except for #3, which is not reported) were significantly less than in 2017.  There is no explanation given for this. 

These are the ‘funds’ to which you can give:

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The disclosure, in the Financial Report, of where the money went, does not mention any projects, and it has to be assumed that ‘Worker Support’ above is ‘Missionary staffing and other costs’:

cid:image011.jpg@01D48E4B.6163F860

The very large increase in ‘Missionary staffing and other costs’ is due to a change in accounting policy.  However, (a) there has been no retrospective application as is required by the Accounting Standards; and (b) there is no explanation for the lack of a corresponding change in Payables. 

The AIS 2018 shows the last three items above as ‘Employee expenses’, a classification that doesn’t match the Accounting Standards.  Plus there is no explanation for how having 23 employees (AIS 2018) generates a zero balance for the last two years for employee entitlements.

There is no mention of the impact of AIM’s work – that is, the Australian workers – on the website or in the Annual Report 2018. 

________________________________________________________

For more a more in-depth review, please contact me.

 

 

 

  1.  https://missionsinterlink.org.au/about/http://tedsherwood.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/word-image-21.png
  2.  See here for last year’s review.
  3.  Focus on the nature of the charity’s work, its beneficiaries and the impact the charity is having in the community.Is it clear what the charity is trying to achieve and how its activities work towards its objectives?Would you like to spend your money, or time if volunteering, to support these objectives?

    Is the charity being transparent about its activities? [A section in the article, Donating and Volunteering].

  4.  https://www.acnc.gov.au/tools/guides/guide-using-template-constitution-companies-limited-guarantee:

 

The Leprosy Mission Australia: charity review

This is review in the series ‘Members of Missions Interlink’, Missions Interlink being ‘the Australian network for global mission[1] (and a means for a Member to get income tax exemption when it might not otherwise be available[2], with a consequent accountability regime).

The Leprosy Mission Australia’ (TLMA) is one such Member, and an organisation that seeks donations from the public.

Both Members and Associates have to accept a set of standards, the introduction to which includes this statement:

http://tedsherwood.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/word-image-20.png

TLMA did not respond to a draft of this review.

The charities’ regulator, the ACNC, in their article, Donating to Legitimate Charities, gives “some things to consider to help you make sure your donation is going where it is intended”:

  1. Check the charity’s name.
  2. Ask for identification from anyone seeking a donation.
  3. Be careful of online requests for donations.
  4. No tax deduction doesn’t mean the charity is not a legitimate one.
  5. Find out more about how the charity says it uses donations.

Here’s the results for ‘The Leprosy Mission Australia’[3], with #5 supplemented by the essentials of the ACNC’s What should I consider when deciding which charity to support?[4].

1.  A search on the ACNC Register of charities leads to a charity with that name.

2. NA

3. The “web address begins with ‘https’” and there is a “closed padlock symbol next to the web address in the address bar”, so the website is secure [the first ACNC article above]. On the page two of the giving process the logo of ‘SecurePay’ is shown, but there is no link to information on this security.

4. The Australian Business Register (linked from TLMA’s ACNC Register record), says that the charity is entitled to receive tax deductible gifts.

5. Contrary to what it says on the Register, in the AIS 2018, on the website, and in the Annual Report 2018, TLMA is not a charity that has projects itself, but is a ‘Supporting Country’, raising money in Australia and providing ‘expertise…to the projects’ they fund (Annual Report, page 30).

In 2018, they raised $5.44 million. From this they made overseas grants of $1.72 million (36% of expenses), and had ‘Employee expenses’ of $1.32 million (27%). They don’t comment on the effectiveness of this fundraising.

Although the note number has been omitted in the statement, Note 20 shows the distribution of the $1.72 million country by country. It is headed ‘Distribution to TLM Global Fellowship’, so presumably the recipient was the national ‘The Leprosy Mission’ organisation in each of those countries?

There is no information on how TLMA ensures that (a) their donations reach these organisations, (b) what happened to the donations after they reached those organisations, and (c) what TLMA does to ensure that your donations are used on the project you selected.

Impact

There is some information on a small portion of the work overseas in the reports of the two mid-term evaluations that were conducted in 2018. A link to the evaluations is not offered. There is no overall assessment of impact, either in 2018 or over the last few years.

________________________________________________________

For more a more in-depth review, please contact me.

  1. https://missionsinterlink.org.au/about/ 
  2. http://tedsherwood.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/word-image-21.png
  3. See here for last year’s review.
  4. Focus on the nature of the charity’s work, its beneficiaries and the impact the charity is having in the community.Is it clear what the charity is trying to achieve and how its activities work towards its objectives?Would you like to spend your money, or time if volunteering, to support these objectives?Is the charity being transparent about its activities? [A section in the article, Donating and Volunteering].

 

Every Home Global Concern Ltd: charity review

This is review in the series ‘Members of Missions Interlink’, Missions Interlink being ‘the Australian network for global mission[1] (and a means for a Member to get income tax exemption when it might not otherwise be available[2], with a consequent accountability regime).

Every Home Global Concern Ltd ’ is one such Member, and an organisation that seeks donations from the public.

Both Members and Associates have to accept a set of standards, the introduction to which includes this statement:

http://tedsherwood.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/word-image-20.png

They did not respond to a draft of this review.

The ACNC, in their article, Donating to Legitimate Charities, gives “some things to consider to help you make sure your donation is going where it is intended”:

  1. Check the charity’s name
  2. Ask for identification from anyone seeking a donation.
  3. Be careful of online requests for donations.
  4. No tax deduction doesn’t mean the charity is not a legitimate one.
  5. Find out more about how the charity says it uses donations.

Here’s the results for ‘Every Home Global Concern Ltd’[3], with #5 supplemented by the essentials of the ACNC’s What should I consider when deciding which charity to support?[4].

1.   A search on the ACNC Register of charities leads to a one in that name.

However, the website on the Register, www.globalconcern.com.au, leads to a website in the name ‘Global Concern’. This is not a registered business name.

The website that is linked from Missions Interlink is different again: www.everyhomeforchrist.org.au.

A search of the Register on the name ‘Every Home for Christ’, leads to the above charity. This is because the charity has recorded that name under ‘Also known as’.

The equation of the two can be seen on the home page of Every Home for Christ: the name in the header is ‘Every Home for Christ’, while in the footer the ACFID accreditation of the charity is described. But the description uses another two different names for the charity, ‘Every Home Global Concern Australia’, and ‘Every Home Global Concern’ , neither of which is registered:

And the second name reports its ABN as 28 004 778 081, an ABN that belongs to World Vision Australia.

The charity also operates a fund, gifts to which may be tax deductible: Every Home Global Concern Ltd Australia Overseas Fund. There is no mention of this fund on either website.

Confusing.

End of review.

_________________________________________________________

Contact me if this charity is still in the running for your donation, and you want the answers to the other questions. A lengthier review is also possible.

 

 

  1. https://missionsinterlink.org.au/about/http://tedsherwood.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/word-image-21.png
  2. See here for last year’s review.
  3. Focus on the nature of the charity’s work, its beneficiaries and the impact the charity is having in the community.Is it clear what the charity is trying to achieve and how its activities work towards its objectives?Would you like to spend your money, or time if volunteering, to support these objectives?Is the charity being transparent about its activities? [A section in the article, Donating and Volunteering].

 

GENESIS Counselling & Training Service Inc: charity review

This is review in the series ‘Members of Missions Interlink’, Missions Interlink being ‘the Australian network for global mission[1] (and a means for a Member to get income tax exemption when it might not otherwise be available[2], with a consequent accountability regime).

GENESIS Counselling & Training Service Inc’ is one such Member, and an organisation that seeks donations from the public.

Both Members and Associates have to accept a set of standards, the introduction to which includes this statement:

http://tedsherwood.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/word-image-20.png

They did not respond to a draft of this review.

The charities’ regulator, the ACNC, in their article, Donating to Legitimate Charities, gives “some things to consider to help you make sure your donation is going where it is intended”:

  1. Check the charity’s name
  2. Ask for identification from anyone seeking a donation.
  3. Be careful of online requests for donations.
  4. No tax deduction doesn’t mean the charity is not a legitimate one.
  5. Find out more about how the charity says it uses donations.

Here’s the results for ‘GENESIS Counselling & Training Service Inc’’[3], with #5 supplemented by the essentials of the ACNC’s What should I consider when deciding which charity to support?[4].

1. A search on the ACNC Register of charities leads to a charity with an almost identical name, Genesis Counselling And Training Inc.(Genesis) (emphasis mine).

2. NA

3. The “web address begins with ‘https’” but there is no “closed padlock symbol next to the web address in the address bar”, so the website is only partly secure [the first ACNC article above].

You cannot donate online so the question of the security of your credit card information is not relevant.

4. The Australian Business Register (linked from Genesis’ ACNC Register record), says that the charity is entitled to receive tax deductible gifts.

5.  For what they do, see the ‘Summary of activities’ on the Overview page on the Register. In 2018, here’s what they did overseas (from the AIS 2018):

“UGANDA – 4 Primary schools with 1,500 village children consistently achieving higher results than Government schools. Secondary School has 500 students. Teacher Training College currently 550 attending – all have employment before graduation. 75 Community Development Groups with 3000 members learning income generation to educate their children in our schools. All groups are eligible to apply for Annual Grants.

KENYA – 10 projects doing well with total beneficiaries of 3,500. All children are in school receiving a cooked meal every school day of the year. A feeding programme for 300 malnourished children has been commenced on Saturdays for remote Maasai children. In another Maasai area, a perimeter fence is being erected to protect children and school buildings from wild animals.

INDONESIA – Training facilities are have been upgraded for tertiary students and pre-school activities running smoothly. Renovations are completed at the Mental Health Facility,

For more detail, see the Annual Report on the Register.

Noting that the figure comes from a Financial Report that has significant issues, 76% of the resources consumed in 2018 are described as ‘Counselling & Training Support’. The note supporting this amount has the name and country of every recipient of this money. The largest amount is only 11% of the total, so the risk is dispersed.

There are no results, outcomes or impact reported on the ACNC Register or the website.

Genesis do not say anywhere how they ensure that your donations are used for the intended purpose. The Annual Report describes some visits by Genesis staff; in those places one can have some confidence on the use of the money.

________________________________________________________

For more a more in-depth review, please contact me.

 

 

  1. https://missionsinterlink.org.au/about/http://tedsherwood.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/word-image-21.png
  2. See here for last year’s review.
  3. Focus on the nature of the charity’s work, its beneficiaries and the impact the charity is having in the community.Is it clear what the charity is trying to achieve and how its activities work towards its objectives?Would you like to spend your money, or time if volunteering, to support these objectives?

    Is the charity being transparent about its activities? [A section in the article, Donating and Volunteering].